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Understanding Passive Fire in the Larger Context of Facility's Safety Features

Passive Fire is not only about fire stopping. It also includes seismic movement, structural element protection and unusual substrates. This webinar will give you more insight into these elements and cover basic regulatory requirements and building compliance processes.

Start
28 May 2024 12:00pm
End
28 May 2024 01:00pm
Member Cost
Complimentary
Non-Member Cost
$40 + GST
CPD Points
1
Event Type
Webinar
Location
Online
Course Level
All
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Event Description

Webinar:
Understanding Passive Fire in the Larger Context of Facility's Safety Features


Join us for a fast-paced online presentation on Passive Fire. 

Passive Fire is not only about fire stopping. It also includes seismic movement, structural element protection and unusual substrates. This webinar will give you more insight into these elements and cover basic regulatory requirements and building compliance processes. 

Seen as a specific part of Fire Protection, Passive Fire is often referred to as “built-in” fire protection and includes many components:
  • Structural elements requiring a higher fire resistance rating than the element itself
  • Seismic movement in fire and smoke separations
  • Active fire curtains and fire shutters
  • Fire-rated dampers in air conditioner ducts
  • Access panels to maintain & inspect these curtains, ducts, seismic joints etc
  • Fire & smoke doors
  • Building service penetrations – electrical, plumbing, data & HVAC+R services, and more
All these components combine to form a continuous passive fire separation along a means of escape. 

CPD
You'll earn 1 CPD point for attending. 

SPEAKER

Malcolm Christie, Specification Manager Passive Fire Systems, Ryanfire
Malcolm has over a decade of experience in the fire protection industry. He served as a member of the Management Committee of the Association of Building Compliance (ABC) and has experience in BWOF compliance in relation to fire/smoke separations.

Malcolm's experience is illustrated when addressing the building consenting process and what appropriate documentary evidence of passive fire compliance may look like. Having had exposure to both the built environment and construction industry, Malcolm draws on his experience to provide insights into the design pitfalls of passive fire protection systems.